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Team-Building Workshops: 2011 Team-Building Pilot

The Team-Building Workshops were created to deepen undergraduate education on Japan by supporting teams of faculty and librarians who work together to develop projects for use in their institutions.

2011 Team Members

Albany University Team: Yu-Hui Chen (ychen@albany.edu) bibliographer and outreach librarian for education and East Asian studies and  Susanna Fessler fessler@albany.edu, Professor of East Asian Studies

Appalachian State University Team: Xiaorong Shao, Asian Studies Librarian specializing in Chinese history, language, culture and business,  (shaox@appstate.edu) and .Xiaofei Tu, Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion (tux@appstate.edu)

Portland State University Team: Linda Ueki Absher absherl@pdx.edu Portland State University reference librarian and Professor of Library Science and  Jon Holt  joholt@pdx.edu Assistant Professor of Japanese 

University of Texas Austin Team: Patricia Maclachlan pmaclachlan@mail.utexas.edu, Associate Professor of Government and Asian Studies and East Asian Studies Librarian  Meng-Fen Su, msu@austin.utexas.edu

Trinity University’s Team: Beatrice Caraway bcaraway@trinity.edu Head of Collection Development, Donald Clark dclark@trinity.edu, Professor of Korean History, Stephen Field sfield@trinity.edu Professor Modern Languages and Literature, Randall Nadeau rnadeau@trinity.edu Professor of Asian Religions, and and Ginger Wu gwu@trinity.edu also in Modern Languages and Literature

Whatcom Community College’s Team: Setsuko Buckley sbuckley@whatcom.ctc.edu, instructor in Japanese and Social Sciences and Library Director Linda Lambert llambert@whatcom.ctc.edu.  Kiki Tommila, Collection Development Librarian and Scott Blume, Reference/Instruction Librarian will provide additional support.

Team Product Timeline

September 29, 2011

Agenda 2011 Team-Building Workshop

 

 

NCC Team-Building Workshop at Trinity University Library

In Conjunction with the Southwestern Conference on Asian Studies (SWCAS)

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Room location details (Library 103)

 

8:30                                    Registration and Coffee

 

9:00-9:15                  Welcoming Remarks, Diane Graves, Trinity University Librarian

 

9:15-9:45                  Brief Overview of Access to Japanese Information Resource, Keiko Yokota-Carter

                                    (Website highlights, LibGuides in Japanese Studies, Cooperative Collections)

 

9:45-10:15                Getting it Fast: Using the Global ILL Framework, Michiko Ito

 

10:15-10:25              Break

 

10:25-11:15              Building Teams and Sharing Expertise, Anne Jumonville

 

11:15-11:45              Finding and Using Visual Images from Japan, Fabiano Rocha

 

11:45-12:30                  Digital Resources Session 1: Brief Introduction, Chiaki Sakai

                                    Hands-on practice with MagazinePlus, Koseisha Zassaku, and JapanKnowledge

                                    including Nihon Kindai Bungakukan (each team will be assigned a dedicated librarian

                                    for face-to-face training.)

                                   

12:30-1:15                  Lunch & Team Networking

 

1:15-2:45                  Hands-On Practice with Yomidas Rekishikan, Asahi Kikuzo, and Nikkei Telecom (Japanese) &

                                    Nikkei.com (English) (each team will be assigned a dedicated librarian

                                    for face-to-face training.)

                                    Brief Overview of the Digital Licensing Process, Keiko Yokota-Carter

 

2:45-2:50                  Break

 

2:50-3:40                  Developing a Project Plan, Anne Jumonville

 

3:40-5:10                  Presentation of Team Projects with Group Critiques (15 minutes per team)

 

5:10-5:30                  Planning the next steps for Teams and their Projects, support services, mentoring,

                                    Working together in an online community, Vickey Bestor

 

 

Team Mentors: Albany University, Fabiano Rocha; Appalachian State University, Michiko Ito; Portland State University, Chiaki Sakai; University of Texas, Austin, Keiko Yokota-Carter; Trinity University, Setsuko Noguchi; Whatcom Community College, Tomoko Bialock

 

NCC’s Team-Building Workshops Pilot has been made possible by a grant from the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership with additional support from the Japan-US Friendship Commission, the Toshiba International Foundation, Trinity University Library, East Asian Studies at Trinity (EAST), and the Southwest Conference of the Association for Asian Studies (SWCAS). 

2011 Team Project Profiles

 Albany University: http://www.albany.edu/ is located in the state capital of New York with nearly 18,000 students at the graduate and undergraduate levels and is part of the State University of New York System (SUNY).

Japanese Studies at Albany: The Japanese Studies program is part of the East Asian Studies department, and has offered a B.A. degree in Japanese since 1994.  The Japanese faculty currently includes three professors, one full-time Japanese language lecturer, and three part-time lecturers. Currently there are approximately 60 Japanese majors.  Non-language classes on Japan include those in religion, philosophy, history, and literature. Albany’s Japanese language and Japan-related library holdings are very small, and are largely the result of Japan Foundation Library grants and recently an NCC Multi-Volume Sets Grant.

The Albany University Team: Susanna Fessler fessler@albany.edu, is Professor of Japanese and teaches the undergraduate Japanese Research and Bibliographic Methods Course.  The second member of the Albany Team is librarian Yu-Hui Chen (ychen@albany.edu) who serves as a bibliographer and outreach librarian for education and East Asian studies. 

Albany University’s Project Plan:  Albany’s goal is to strengthen holdings and to explore ways to work with other institutions to expand electronic database access (for example, by subscribing to JapanKnowledge, currently too expensive for them to afford). They hope to network with other campuses to improve all student access to library materials.  Additionally, because of their limited acquisitions budget, Albany will explore open access Japanese digital resources and make them accessible to faculty and students through use of LibGuides. All new materials they develop will also benefit the Japanese Research and Bibliographic Methods undergraduate course. Albany is a GIF members, but needs to work further with their ILL department to explore the features and take full advantage of GIF’s International ILL and Document Delivery Service to support development of their hybrid curriculum.

 

Appalachian State University: http://www.appstate.edu is located in Boone, North Carolina, part of the University of North Carolina System, ASU has almost 17,000 students.

Japanese Studies at ASU: Appalachian State University offers Japanese language instruction from beginning to advanced levels, as well as Japanese history, art, and politics. Through its Global Learning Initiative, the university is committed to increasing course offerings in international studies including Japanese studies.

The ASU Team: Xiaofei Tu, assistant professor of Philosophy and Religion of ASU (tux@appstate.edu), has taught undergraduate courses about Japanese religions, history and culture. He serves as a coordinator of the theme “Religion, Myth, and Society” in the General Education Program. For Spring 2012 he is designing “Japanese Religions” and petitioning for its inclusion in the General Education Program to provide a culturally diverse and pedagogically effective course to a larger number of students. Xiaorong Shao, is the only Asian librarian working at the ASU Library. She has provided library research assistance for faculty and students at ASU as well as visiting scholars from overseas mostly in the fields of Chinese history, language, culture and business. Dr. Shao will help incorporate library resources into the class, and teach the library components of the course (shaox@appstate.edu).

ASU’s Team Project will create a Japanese Religions Course: A general survey of religions of Japan designed for students who have no prior knowledge of Japanese religions, history, or culture. It will strive to keep a balance between introducing the historical roots and fundamental beliefs of Japanese religions, and exploring their cultural expressions.  It is intended to serve both students who wish to gain a basic knowledge of non-Western religions and students who seek general grounding in preparation for more advanced studies of East Asian religious traditions such as Buddhism, Shinto, and Confucianism.

 

Portland State University: http://pdx.edu/ is located in Oregon’s largest city and is a university of nearly 30,000 undergraduates and graduate students. 

Japanese Studies at Portland State: Japanese has been offered since the 1970s with a major since 1988.  Through the World Languages and Literature Program, students may receive both a BA and MA in Japanese with possible certificates in K-12 education or in Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language. Five primary faculty in Japanese offer a full four-year program in Japanese. Other Japanese studies courses are taught in history, performing arts, and economics.  The Center for Japanese studies assists with program development, fund raising and outreach to the community.

Portland State Team: Jon Holt  joholt@pdx.edu is Assistant Professor of Japanese and Linda Ueki Absher absherl@pdx.edu Portland State University reference librarian and Professor of Library Science, is also known as The Lipstick Librarian and an outspoken advocate for the library profession. 

Portland State Project’s goal is primarily to find ways to enhance support of faculty and student research using digital resources.  Private donors have expressed interest in helping PSU and its Center for Japanese Studies to expand its commitment to Japanese study and research.  PSU is looking at ways to create a gateway for students and faculty to take advantage of existing media provider and information networks to enhance the resource-access skills of their librarians and Japan-affiliated faculty to enable them to forge ahead in enhancing Japanese studies and research at PSU.

 

University of Texas at Austin: http://www.utexas.edu/ is the flagship institution of the University of Texas system located in the state capital with about 51,000 students at all levels of instructions.

Japanese Studies at UT-Austin:   There are five tenure track faculty and six Japanese language lecturers with particular strengths in political science, history, literature and culture.  Its Japanese language collections numbers nearly 68,000 volumes with 176 serial titles.  They subscribe to the JapanKnowledge and Zasshi kiji sakuin shusei database. 

UT Austin Team: Patricia Maclachlan pmaclachlan@mail.utexas.edu, Professor of Government and Asian Studies with team up with UT’s East Asian Studies Librarian  Meng-Fen Su, msu@austin.utexas.edu.

University of Texas-Austin’s Team Project: will create a course packet for instructing Japanese studies students on library usage and on Japan-related databases and free Internet sources (in both English and Japanese).  In addition to instructing both undergraduate and graduate students on how to use the library catalog and its many search engines, the packet will include tips on how to develop research topics in various disciplines with recommended bibliographic references to begin such projects.  This packet will be developed as an extension and a supplement to librarian-led presentations on library usage and will also help students to better evaluate websites in English and Japanese. 

 

Trinity University: http://web.trinity.edu/ in San Antonio Texas is NCC’s host for the workshop and has 2,600 undergraduate and graduate students.

Japanese Studies at Trinity University: East Asian Studies at Trinity (EAST) is a strong and interdisciplinary center with important strengths in Chinese and Korean Studies and is active in sending students abroad and in K-12 Outreach.  The University does not currently have significant strengths in Japanese studies and is working to build its programs.

Trinity University’s Team: As the local host of the Workshop Trinity will bring a large and varied team to the Workshop.  Faculty Donald Clark dclark@trinity.edu, Professor of Korean History, Randall Nadeau rnadeau@trinity.edu Professor of Asian Religions, and Stephen Field sfield@trinity.edu Professor Modern Languages and Literature, and Ginger Wu gwu@trinity.edu also in Modern Languages and Literature are the leading faculty in East Asian Studies at Trinity, joining them will be Beatrice Caraway bcaraway@trinity.edu head of collection development, a frequent writer on library issues, and library liaison for this workshop. 

Trinity University’s Team Project: is to resurrect the dormant “Japanese Perspectives” course to provide a portal for students and faculty into Japanese culture.  Professor Donald Clark will anchor this effort and plans to offer the course in the Fall of 2012 with the assistance of other members of the Trinity Team.  The course will introduce students to Japanese culture in its religious, political, aesthetic, and social dimensions.   Taught from an interdisciplinary perspective the course will focus on Japan since 1945 and feature guest lecturers from other Trinity departments, from the community, and region. A long-term goal of the project is to write a grant proposal to fund the course, to purchase critical digital resources, and to support the further development of Japanese studies at Trinity. 

 

Whatcom Community College: http://www.whatcom.ctc.edu/ is a state-supported, public, comprehensive two-year college located in Bellingham, Washington.

Japanese Studies at Whatcom Community College: WCC offers five Japanese language courses providing a strong basic grounding in Japanese as well as courses in History of Japan and Japanese Culture and Society.  The History of Japan courses are offered both face-to-face and online.

Whatcom Community College’s Team: will be made up of Setsuko Buckley sbuckley@whatcom.ctc.edu, instructor in Japanese and Social Sciences and Library Director Linda Lambert llambert@whatcom.ctc.edu.  Kiki Tommila, Collection Development Librarian and Scott Blume, Reference/Instruction Librarian will provide additional support.

Whatcom Community College’s Team Project: The goal of WCC’s team project is 1) to increase digital resources for the support of classes related to Japanese studies; 2) to develop Lib Guides that will assist students and faculty; and 3) to increase student awareness of library digital and printed resources.

Subject Guide

Funding and Co-Sponsorship for Team-Workshop 2011

In addition to Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership,    

additional support has been received from the Japan-US Friendship Commission, the Toshiba International Foundation, Trinity University Library, East Asian Studies at Trinity (EAST), and the Southwest Conference of the Association for Asian Studies (SWCAS). 

 

Team Discussion Board

North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources
北米日本研究資料調整協議会
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